Course Builder

Biology

Mix and match any of the lessons below to customize your own Biology course syllabus. 


With our wide array of innovative and classic biology lessons, your students will observe biological phenomena, generate testable hypotheses, collect and analyze data, and more. All of our biology lab kits provide students with lab-grade materials that match the sophistication of a formal lab facility. For dissections, we offer high quality specimens of both vertebrates and invertebrates. In experiments that use microscopy, you can choose between a physical microscope or our virtual microscope for any lesson.

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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the specificity of lactase in reactions with milk and sucrose.
  • Analyze experimental data to determine the optimal pH and temperature ranges for lactase activity.
  • Relate experimental results to conditions within the human body.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create monohybrid crosses for millet seed samples.
  • Examine corn for color and texture and design dihybrid crosses for the sample.
  • Analyze the distributions of genotypes from plat crosses with chi-square tests.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create Punnett squares for genetic conditions including color blindness, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs disease, and Huntington’s disease.
  • Interpret a series of pedigree charts and describe inheritance of hemophilia.
  • Read 4 karyotypes, diagnose genetic abnormalities, and describe phenotypes and genotypes.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create Punnett squares for 10 traits.
  • Identify homozygous dominant, homozygous recessive, and heterozygous alleles for common human traits.
  • Perform karyotyping on two sets of chromosomes to identify potential chromosomal disorders.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Apply the scientific method to demonstrate mass differences between carbon dioxide and dry air.
  • Model the effects of greenhouse gases on temperature using the scientific method.
  • Design a controlled experiment to investigate the effects of sea ice on ocean temperature.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Calculate the total magnification and field of view for the lenses on an optical microscope.
  • Examine prepared slides under scanning, low, and high-power lenses.
  • Prepare wet-mount slides and practice staining technique.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform a controlled experiment to investigate the role of carbon and light availability in photosynthesis.
  • Graphically analyze experimental data.
  • Design a novel study to investigate other variables influencing photosynthetic rates.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create models to simulate the stages of mitosis and meiosis in an animal cell.
  • View microscope slides of plant and animal cells undergoing mitosis.
  • Identify the different stages of mitosis in plant and animal cells.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Measure osmosis in living cells using potato sections and sugar solutions.
  • Analyze experimental data to classify solutions as hypotonic, hypertonic, or isotonic.
  • Examine the selective permeability of a membrane to molecules of different sizes.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Germinate millet seeds under experimental conditions.
  • Measure respiration rates as a function of water displacement by germinated and dormant millet seeds.
  • Graphically analyze experimental data.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Identify and label the cellular structures of bacteria, animal, and plant cells.
  • Examine microscope slides of plant, animal, bacteria, and protist cells.
  • Categorize organisms as prokaryotic or eukaryotic based on cellular structures.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Investigate the properties of cohesion and adhesion in water and demonstrate how these properties contribute to surface tension and capillary action.
  • Extract the anthocyanin pigment from red cabbage to create pH strips.
  • Measure the pH of common household items with commercial and homemade indicators.
  • Investigate the effect of buffers on a living system by graphing pH changes for unbuffered and buffered solutions.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Build the structures of 14 macromolecules using a modeling kit.**
    ** There are two versions of this lab. Only one version offers this modeling kit.
  • Perform qualitative tests to determine the presence of lipids, sugars, proteins, and starch in a variety of samples.
  • Identify an unknown through its composition of macromolecules.
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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Dissect a clam (Anodonta spp.) from phylum Mollusca and a grasshopper (Brachystoma spp.) from phylum Arthropoda.
  • Identify and label the internal features of a clam and grasshopper.
  • Relate internal and external structures of protostomes to their functions.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Dissect the sea star (Pisaster spp.), frog (Rana forreri), and perch (Pomadasys macracanthus) and identify the major organs of each animal.
  • Describe the function of organs identified through dissection.
  • Compare and contrast echinoderm and chordate structures.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize the habitat, feeding, reproduction, and unique features of phyla Porifera, Cnidaria, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Rotifera, and Annelida.
  • Examine prepared slides of a budding Hydra, planarian, and rotifer.
  • Dissect a common earthworm (Lumbricus terrestris) from phylum Annelida and identify internal and external structures.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create a Venn diagram to classify the characteristics of mammals.
  • Identify the major internal organs of a human and describe their functions.
  • Dissect a fetal pig and label key internal structures.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize the characteristics of the 12 animal phyla.
  • Create a dichotomous key for identifying common household items.
  • Examine and identify five microbes using a dichotomous key.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Identify positive and negative feedback and determine the stimulus, receptor, control center, effector, and response for various stimuli.
  • Test the body’s sensitivity to temperature through exposure to a series of water baths and various temperatures.
  • Collect and analyze data on heart rate during a series of exercises.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Record energy, trash, transportation, food, and water consumption for 48 hours.
  • Calculate an individual’s carbon footprint.
  • Apply lifestyle changes to minimize environmental impacts.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Calculate the number and frequency of alleles and genotypes in a population.
  • Use the Hardy-Weinberg equation to compare predicted and observed data.
  • Analyze and compare a population subjected to no agents of evolution and a population subjected to natural selection.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create a generalized phylogenetic tree of plants and summarize the features of mosses, ferns, and conifers.
  • Examine the macroscopic and microscopic structures of a moss (Bryophyta).
  • Relate the morphology of confer reproductive structures to their functions.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Observe and compare the roots, stems, leaves, and flowers of a monocot and dicot plant.
  • Examine prepared slides of root, stem, and leaf tissue of a monocot and dicot.
  • Relate internal and external structures of angiosperms to their functions.
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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Dissect a barn owl pellet.
  • Use a dichotomous key to identify the rodent species present.
  • Relate owl diet to habitat characteristics.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Prepare 1 m2 quadrats in two distinct areas.
  • Collect abiotic and biotic data on weather, soil type, and species composition in two quadrats.
  • Interpret the relationship between habitats and observed species.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Distinguish renewable energy from alternative energy and discuss examples of each.
  • Review and compare energy profiles of two U.S. states and draw conclusions about production and consumption.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Collect and culture microbes from six household surfaces on agar slants.
  • Create and Gram stain four bacteria smears.
  • Relate experimental results to microbial diversity contained on fomites.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • List shared characteristics of animals that belong to phylum Arthropoda.
  • Compare and contrast external anatomical features of a garden spider (Argiope sp.), crayfish (Cambarus sp.), and the plains lubber grasshopper (Brachystola magna).
  • Dissect a crayfish and grasshopper and identify and label internal organs.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize the characteristics of five vertebrate classes.
  • Examine the skeletal structure of bony fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals.
  • Relate vertebrate structure to survival adaptations.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Explain how dichotomous keys are used to identify organisms.
  • Use a dichotomous key to identify adult dragonflies to the family taxonomic level.
  • Create a dichotomous key for leaf types based on morphological observations.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Analyze and interpret EMGs (electromyographies) to view the results of coactivation and the effect of nerve stimulation on muscle twitch and summation.
  • Measure fatigue both quantitatively and qualitatively after performing forearm exercises.
  • Perform maximal vertical jump tests and compare results between stretch-shortening and non-stretch shortening cycles.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize the agents, incidence, symptoms, prevention, and treatment of six contagious diseases.
  • Model the transmission of a contagion using chemical substances.
  • Relate the transmission of infectious disease to common social practices.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Identify three food samples by smell and/or taste.
  • Compare the ability to taste and smell between different individuals.
  • Relate experimental results to the interactions between the chemoreceptors for taste and smell.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform measurements using a graduated cylinder, volumetric flask, graduated pipet, ruler, digital scale, beaker, and thermometer.
  • Apply Archimedes’ principle and the water displacement method to measure the volume of an irregularly shaped object.
  • Create solutions of varying concentrations and densities by diluting a stock solution.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Apply the scientific method to address 2 real-world problems.
  • Construct hypotheses and collect qualitative and quantitative data from systematic observations of 5 white, solid substances.
  • Design a controlled experiment, conduct observations, and draw conclusions about the identities of 3 unknown substances.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Construct an electrical circuit using a photovoltaic cell and digital multimeter.
  • Calculate wattage from voltage and amperage measurements.
  • Relate power output to tilt angle for a photovoltaic cell.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Diagram the hydrologic cycle, utilizing arrows and key terms.
  • Construct a simplified model of the hydrologic cycle to observe condensation, evaporation, and precipitation in a closed system.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Model the effects of greenhouse gas concentrations on global average temperatures using a simulation.
  • Examine the effects of clouds on solar radiation, infrared radiation, and atmospheric temperatures.
  • Apply experimental results to predict future climate trends.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Research evolutionary mechanisms for various given scenarios.
  • Identify the evolutionary processes at play for each scenario.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Analyze research on a country to determine the amount, methods, and implications of deforestation occurring in the past 50 years.
  • Create a flowchart to show the causes and effects of deforestation.
  • Identify mitigation strategies for deforestation.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize the habitat, feeding, mobility, and reproduction of bacteria, Daphnia, and Hydra.
  • Create two experimental microcosms and compare their inhabitants.
  • Examine living microbes under the microscope.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Compare the biotic and abiotic components of two ecosystems.
  • Examine an owl pellet and identify its contents.
  • Relate owl diet to habitat characteristics.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Analyze a series of photos for the stage of succession they represent.
  • Differentiate between primary and secondary succession initiators.
  • Relate ecological succession to a local ecosystem.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Model population growth and graphically illustrate the data.
  • Relate population trends to resource constraints.
  • Calculate the probability of death within a cohort from cemetery data and graphically illustrate the results.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Model acid deposition using nitrogen oxides and bromocresol green.
  • Examine how a buffer affects acid deposition.
  • Measure the effects of acid deposition on different types of rocks.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create codons for a specific protein sequence and identify codon mutations.
  • Perform gel electrophoresis using food coloring as DNA.
  • Analyze electrophoresis results to determine molecule size.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize each step of mitosis.
  • Examine images of plant and animal cells undergoing mitosis.
  • Identify the different stages of mitosis in cells of an onion root tip and whitefish blastula.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Summarize the structure of a double-stranded DNA molecule.
  • Isolate DNA from split peas by physically breaking down plant tissues, lysing cell membranes with detergent, and precipitating isolated DNA in alcohol.
  • Record observations of the appearance and volume of DNA extracted from peas.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Model the processes of transcription and translation.
  • Construct a DNA molecule, mRNA strand, and a series of tRNA molecules.
  • Write the anti-codons and amino acids carried by tRNA for the synthesis of a protein.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Analyze four soil samples for pH, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium levels.
  • Examine the physical properties of soil samples, including weight and porosity.
  • Calculate the percentage of sand, silt, and clay in soil samples to determine the texture.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Examine cross sections of living root and stem tissue with a hand lens and microscope.
  • Analyze the annual ring pattern of a woody plant stem.
  • Model transpiration with a celery stalk and colored water.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Identify and label the reproductive structures of a fresh flower.
  • Examine samples of pollen and ovules under the microscope.
  • Dissect an immature fruit and observe the structures of a developing seed.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Conduct a controlled experiment germinating seeds in five salt concentrations.
  • Measure seedling growth for five days.
  • Relate experimental results to the effects of soil salinization in nature.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Calculate species richness and composition from plant survey diagrams.
  • Design a plant survey for a local ecosystem.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Measure the pH, phosphate, nitrate, and fecal coliform levels of three water samples.
  • Rank the water quality of bottled water, tap water, and a collected water sample.
  • Relate water quality to environmental sources of contamination.
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My Syllabus

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