Course Builder

Environmental Science

Mix and match any of the lessons below to customize your own Environmental Science course syllabus. 


Our Environmental Science curriculum features an interdisciplinary blend of concepts in biology, chemistry, physics, geology, and mathematics. Through practical activities like calculating a carbon footprint and measuring water quality, students will address complex environmental problems including climate change, pollution, and conservation. These hands-on lessons will prepare them to shape and navigate the future of their planet.

Add

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Explore the concepts of population ecology and how density-independent and density-dependent variables affect population growth.
  • Model exponential population growth and relate population trends to resource constraints.
  • Calculate the probability of death using data collected from a cemetery.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Calculate the number and frequency of alleles and genotypes in a population.
  • Use the Hardy-Weinberg equation to compare predicted and observed data.
  • Analyze and compare a population subjected to no agents of evolution and a population subjected to natural selection.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Prepare 1 m2 quadrats in two distinct areas.
  • Collect abiotic and biotic data on weather, soil type, and species composition in two quadrats.
  • Interpret the relationship between habitats and observed species.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Record energy, transportation, food and water consumption for 48 hours.
  • Calculate an individual’s carbon footprint.
  • Apply lifestyle changes to minimize environmental impacts.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Measure the pH, phosphate, nitrate, and fecal coliform levels of three water samples.
  • Rank the water quality of bottled water, tap water, and a collected water sample.
  • Relate water quality to environmental sources of contamination.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Conduct a controlled experiment germinating seeds in five salt concentrations.
  • Measure seedling growth for five days.
  • Relate experimental results to the effects of soil salinization in nature.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Assemble a calorimeter and measure the heat produced from two different types of fuels.
  • Calculate the energy content of isopropyl alcohol and paraffin wax by burning the fuels and measuring temperature change.
  • Compare the molecular structure and energy content of each fuel.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Model acid deposition using nitrogen oxides and bromocresol green.
  • Examine how a buffer affects acid deposition.
  • Model the effects of acid deposition on different types of rock.
Return to Top
Add

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Compare the biotic and abiotic components of two ecosystems.
  • Examine an owl pellet and identify its contents.
  • Relate owl diet to habitat characteristics.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform measurements using a graduated cylinder, volumetric flask, graduated pipet, ruler, digital scale, beaker, and thermometer.
  • Apply Archimedes’ Principle and the water displacement method to measure the volume of an irregularly shaped object.
  • Create solutions of varying concentrations and densities by diluting a stock solution.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Construct an electrical circuit using a photovoltaic cell and digital multimeter.
  • Calculate wattage from voltage and amperage measurements.
  • Relate power output to tilt angle for a photovoltaic cell.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Analyze research on a country to determine the amount, methods, and implications, of deforestation occurring in the past 50 years.
  • Create a flowchart to show the causes and effects of deforestation.
  • Identify mitigation strategies for deforestation.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Distinguish renewable energy from alternative energy and discuss examples of each.
  • Review and compare energy profiles of two U.S. states and draw conclusions about production and consumption.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Analyze the pH, nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium levels of three provided soil samples.
  • Measure the bulk density, porosity, and permeability of four soil samples.
  • Categorize soil samples based on texture.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform a controlled experiment to investigate the role of carbon and light availability in photosynthesis.
  • Graphically analyze experimental data.
  • Design a novel study to investigate other variables influencing photosynthetic rates.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Investigate how temperature and other factors impact dissolved oxygen levels in water.
  • Use Winkler’s solutions to analyze the amount of dissolved oxygen in water samples at different temperatures.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Measure the concentration of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a water sample obtained from their home.
  • Perform a titration of the water sample using EDTA and EBT as an indicator.
  • Calculate the level of water hardness and concentration of CaCO3 in their water source.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Assemble a simple colorimeter.
  • Create a calibration curve using the colorimeter to measure resistance of stock phosphate solutions of known concentrations.
  • Use the calibration curve to calculate phosphate concentrations in water samples from a waste-water treatment plant, farm stream, and a collected sample from the local environment.
Return to Top

My Syllabus

Select lessons below to build your syllabus.
Review