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General, Organic, and Biochemistry (GOB)

Mix and match any of the lessons below to customize your GOB Chemistry course.


GOB Chemistry combines the fundamentals of general, organic, and biochemistry, offering more than 30 lessons full of tactile experiments that students can conduct in their own home. Our experiment catalogue is ideal for non-chemistry majors and students majoring in health sciences. These lessons help students meet the requirements for pre-nursing and other allied health professions.

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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform a series of chemical reactions.
  • Make scientific observations and use them to make scientific conclusions.
  • Distinguish between heating and burning and demonstrate each.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform chemical equilibrium reactions and manipulate chemical systems through concentration and temperature.
  • Perform calculations to determine the equilibrium constant (K).
  • Apply Le Chatelier’s principle to predict changes and explain observed changes in a chemical system.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Apply titration techniques to investigate acetic acid in commercial vinegar.
  • Determine the molar concentration of acetic acid in commercial vinegar.
  • Calculate the average concentration and the percent concentrations (%) of acetic acid in vinegar.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Observe and describe the process of osmosis through a semi-permeable membrane.
  • Determine the molecular mass of a compound using osmotic pressure data.
  • Examine how the freezing and boiling points of solutions change as a result of the amount of solute present.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Calculate the number of moles, molecules, and atoms of a substance.
  • Calculate the number of moles of water released by a hydrate.
  • Determine the empirical formula of the hydrate from the formula of the anhydrous compound and experimental data.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform flame and chemical tests on isolated gases from controlled experiments.
  • Categorize gases produced in experimental reactions.
  • Analyze experimental results to identify unknown gases.
  • Demonstrate Charles’ Law.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create an acetic acid/sodium acetate buffer solution.
  • Test a buffer solution by the addition of acids and bases.
  • Evaluate buffering capacity in response to additions of concentrated and diluted acids and bases.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform single displacement reactions on metals to develop an activity series.
  • Write chemical equations for redox reactions based on experimental results.
  • Apply the appropriate rules for assigning oxidation numbers.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform confirmation tests in the form of chemical reactions to identify anions.
  • Perform confirmation tests in the form of flame tests to identify cations.
  • Interpret data to identify cations and anions in unknown ionic compounds.
  • Identify the unique characteristics of anions and cations.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Generate a colored periodic table to distinguish between the groups of elements.
  • Write the names for ionic compounds, molecular compounds, polyatomic ions, and acids by interpreting their formulas.
  • Write the formulas for ionic compounds, molecular compounds, polyatomic ions, and acids by interpreting their formulas.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Draw Lewis structures for molecules.
  • Create VSEPR models of molecules with molecular modeling kits.
  • Use the periodic table to identify number of valence electrons of elements.
  • Diagram resonance structures.
  • Classify the VSEPR of a molecule.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Perform measurements using a graduated cylinder, volumetric flask, graduated pipet, ruler, digital scale, beaker, and thermometer.
  • Apply Archimedes’ Principle and the water displacement method to measure the volume of an irregularly shaped object.
  • Calculate experimental error.
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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Isolate DNA from split peas by physically breaking down plant tissues, lysing cell membranes with detergent, and precipitating isolated DNA in alcohol.
  • Record observations of the appearance and volume of DNA extracted from peas.
  • List the four nitrogenous bases of DNA and describe base-pairing.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the specificity of lactase in reactions with milk and sucrose.
  • Analyze experimental data to determine the optimal pH and temperature ranges for lactase activity.
  • Relate experimental results to conditions within the human body.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Synthesize four soaps from plant oils by performing saponification reactions.
  • Analyze the effectiveness of synthesized soaps in distilled and hard water.
  • Compare the performance of soaps and a commercial detergent in experimental conditions and relate findings to chemical properties of the oils, including saturation and polarity.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Extract starch from malted barley.
  • Calculate alcohol by volume.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Predict the presence of proteins in six substances.
  • Use biuret reagent to detect peptide bonds in six substances.
  • Validate experimental results with nutritional data.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Test substances for the presence of reducing sugars and starches.
  • Use a digestive enzyme to break down a starch into monosaccharides.
  • Analyze the chemical differences and similarities between sugars and artificial sweeteners.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Construct models of geometric and optical isomers with a molecular modeling.
  • Compare molecular models to identify stereoisomers.
  • Relate molecular arrangements to the physical and chemical properties of stereoisomers.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Construct models of simple hydrocarbons, aromatics, aldehydes, and ketones using a molecular modeling kit.
  • Compare molecular models to identify structural isomers.
  • Relate structural formulas to three-dimensional molecules.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Use the IUPAC system to name a series of esters.
  • Synthesize fragrant esters by reacting a series of carboxylic acids and alcohols.
  • Relate the aroma and solubility of esters to their chemical structures.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Outline common NSAIDs by identifying brand names, whether each drug is available only by prescription, typical uses, and which forms of the enzyme cyclooxygenase are inhibited by the drug.
  • Perform a hydrolysis reaction with acetylsalicylic acid and water.
  • Test for the presence of salicylic acid using iron (III) chloride.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Label hydrogen bond donor and acceptors on alcohol-containing molecules.
  • Measure the solubility of seven alcohols in water and oil.
  • Relate molecular structure to the boiling points of two alcohols.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Draw bond-line structures of organic compounds using the IUPAC name.
  • Illustrate organic-compound structural isomers based on molecular formulas.
  • Draw bond-line structures, including dash and wedge structures for geometric isomers.
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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Build a hydrometer.
  • Prepare solutions of known sugar concentrations to use to create a calibration curve of hydrometer measurements.
  • Determine sugar concentrations of soft drinks and juices by comparing hydrometer measurements to a calibration curve.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Examine the effects of varying reactant concentrations in chemical reactions.
  • Analyze data to determine the order of a reaction.
  • Summarize the rate law for an observed reaction.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Apply how the properties of a molecule affect melting point to predict the greater melting range between tetracosane and 1-tetradecanol.
  • Determine the melting point of tetracosane and 1-tetradecanol.
  • Measure the melting point of a mixture of two compounds.
  • Relate the properties influencing melting points to experimental data.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Write numbers in scientific and standard notation.
  • Solve unit conversion problems and simple algebraic equations.
  • Create and analyze graphs.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create chromatograms of various food dyes and common food items using paper chromatography.
  • Calculate Rf values for known and unknown solutions.
  • Analyze chromatogram data to identify unknown dyes in common food items.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Use stoichiometry to determine the amount of reactant needed to create the maximum amount of product in a precipitation reaction.
  • Perform a precipitation reaction and measure the precipitate.
  • Calculate the percent yield of a precipitation reaction and compare the value to the theoretical yield.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate separation techniques involving solubility and magnetism.
  • Determine the pure substances that comprise a mixture of solids.
  • Calculate the percent composition of each pure substance that is present in a mixture of solids.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Create a rudimentary calorimeter and use it to determine the energy content of three foods.
  • Calculate the energy content of the three foods based on the heat released during burning.
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