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Organic Chemistry

Mix and match any of our lessons to customize your own Organic Chemistry course syllabus. 


With Science Interactive’s Organic Chemistry curriculum, students will explore the components of life itself through the analysis of organic compounds and molecules. Chemicals are delivered in microscale quantities for safe use at home with minimal waste, and the included experiments teach students the techniques they’ll need to know to complete their chemistry training. Each lesson includes rigorous procedures, exploration content, and evaluations to ensure your students not only complete the experiment, but understand and can apply its concepts.

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By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Define solubility, recrystallization and extraction.
    • Explain how acids and bases change the solubility of organic compounds.
    • Describe methods of extraction.
    • Analyze the solubility of solids in different solvents.
    • Relate experimental results to the polarity of the compound.
    • Evaluate the relationship between temperature and solubility.
    • Examine how acids and bases change the solubility of organic molecules in aqueous solutions.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Define monomer, polymer, and plasticizer.
    • Explain how monomer structure affects the properties of a polymer.
    • Define plasticizers and explain how they affect flexibility in polymers.
    • Synthesize a polymer from polyvinyl acetate glue and sodium tetraborate.
    • Compare the physical properties of synthesized polymers.
    • Measure the effects of a plasticizer on two polymers.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Describe caffeine and its natural sources.
    • Describe phase changes.
    • Describe crystallization.
    • Explain chemical extraction.
    • Extract caffeine from a mixture.
    • Purify caffeine by sublimation.
    • Determine the percent isolation of caffeine.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Explain the Twelve Principles of Green Chemistry.
    • Describe the effects of temperature, pressure, and concentration on the chemical system of a reaction.
    • Define chemical equilibrium, chemical system, equilibrium constant, and Le Châtelier’s principle.
    • Practice green chemistry techniques to demonstrate Le Châtelier’s Principle.
    • Manipulate temperature and pH on two chemical systems.
    • Apply Le Châtelier’s principle to predict and explain changes in a chemical system.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Define chromatography, mobile phase and stationary phase.
    • Explain column chromatography and its application.
    • Discuss how UV-Vis spectrometry can be used to determine food dye concentration.
    • Isolate two food dyes in grape soda using column chromatography.
    • Analyze red and blue food dye fractions using a colorimeter.
    • Determine the concentration of isolated red and blue food dye from grape soda

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Describe spectrometry.
    • Define nuclear magnetic resonance, spin-spin coupling, and chemical shift.
    • Interpret the integration, multiplicity, and degrees of unsaturation in a spectrum.
    • Label multiplicity and number of hydrogens in a spectrum.
    • Recognize and label common functional group NMR patterns.
    • Determine molecular structure based on provided spectra

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

    • Define infrared radiation and spectroscopy.
    • Relate vibrational energy to organic functional groups.
    • Explain how to assign peaks to functional groups.
    • Describe how to solve an infrared spectrum.
    • Label peaks on infrared spectra. Determine functional groups present in spectra.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Apply how the properties of a molecule affect melting point to predict the greater melting range between tetracosane and 1-tetradecanol.
  • Determine the melting point of tetracosane and 1-tetradecanol.
  • Measure the melting point of a mixture of two compounds.
  • Relate the properties influencing melting points to experimental data.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Synthesize four soaps from plant oils by performing saponification reactions.
  • Analyze the effectiveness of synthesized soaps in distilled and hard water.
  • Compare the performance of soaps and a commercial detergent in experimental conditions and relate findings to chemical properties of the oils, including saturation and polarity.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Construct models of simple hydrocarbons, aromatics, aldehydes, and ketones using a molecular modeling kit.
  • Compare molecular models to identify structural isomers.
  • Relate structural formulas to three-dimensional molecules.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Draw bond-line structures of organic compounds using the IUPAC name.
  • Illustrate organic-compound structural isomers based on molecular formulas.
  • Draw bond-line structures, including dash and wedge structures for geometric isomers.

By the end of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Construct models of geometric and optical isomers using a modeling kit.
  • Compare molecular models to identify stereoisomers.
  • Relate molecular arrangements to the chemical properties of stereoisomers.
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By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define esters as an organic functional group.
  • Discuss physical properties of esters.
  • Describe the IUPAC naming system for esters.
  • Use the IUPAC system to name a series of esters.
  • Synthesize fragrant esters by reacting a series of carboxylic acids and alcohols.
  • Relate the aroma and solubility of esters to their chemical structures.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe chromatography and how it is used to identify unknown mixtures.
  • Discuss the different types of chromatography and their applications.
  • Explain how paper chromatography is used to separate compounds.
  • Define Rf (Retention factor) values. Describe FD&C dyes and their uses.
  • Create chromatograms of various food dyes and common food items using paper chromatography.
  • Calculate Rf values for known and unknown solutions.
  • Analyze chromatogram data to identify unknown dyes in common food items.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify carbohydrates and describe their general structure and molecular formula.
  • Define monosaccharide, disaccharide, polysaccharide, and reducing sugar.
  • Explain the differences between artificial sweeteners and sugar.
  • Describe how Benedict’s reagent and IKI indicator can be used to detect the presence of simple sugars and starches.
  • Test substances for the presence of reducing sugars and starches.
  • Use a digestive enzyme to break down a starch into monosaccharides.
  • Analyze the chemical differences and similarities between sugars and artificial sweeteners.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Classify types of alcohols.
  • Identify reaction types for alcohols.
  • Explain boiling point trends for alcohols.
  • Describe functional group polarity and its relationship to solubility.
  • Classify reactions involving alcohols.
  • Measure the solubility of seven alcohols in water and oil.
  • Relate molecular structure to the boiling points of two alcohols.

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the biochemical role of aspirin and other NSAIDs in the body.
  • Define the roles of the enzyme cyclooxygenase and prostaglandins in the body.
  • Identify commercially-available NSAIDs and their uses.
  • Discriminate between drugs that are nonselective COX inhibitors and COX-2 inhibitors.
  • Define hydrolysis and condensation and apply these to the reactions involved in the synthesis of acetylsalicylic acid.
  • Outline common NSAIDs by identifying brand names, whether each drug is available only by prescription, typical uses, and which forms of the enzyme cyclooxygenase are inhibited by the drug.
  • Perform a hydrolysis reaction with acetylsalicylic acid and water.
  • Test for the presence of salicylic acid using iron(III) chloride.
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